High Flux Isotope Reactor

National Laboratory: 
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Characterization Class: 
Extreme Environment Testing
Mechanical Behavior of Materials
Microscopy
Non-destructive examination
Description: 

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is an 85-MW research reactor that features 12 neutron beamlines accessible via a competitive "user proposal" process.

Capability Bounds: 

The IMAGING beamline enables detailed neutron radiography and 3D computed tomography on bulk components with a spatial resolution of tens of microns. This technique is complementary to x-ray computer tomography, and the great depth of penetration in many metal alloys leads to a wide range of applications across materials science and engineering. [1]

The GPSANS beamline enables small angle neutron scattering studies on solid samples for characterization of features such as porosity, radiation damage, or precipitates over size ranges from 1-200 nanometers. [2,3]

The engineering beamline NRSF2 enables neutron diffraction based mapping of bulk solid samples primarily for studies of residual stresses in many metal alloys, particularly high-strength steel and aluminum. It has been used to quantify residual stress and structure-property relationships of a friction stir spot welded magnesium alloy. [4]

Unique Aspects: 

Presently, the HFIR is the only reactor-based neutron source at a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) laboratory (the National Institute of Standards and Technology Center for Neutron Research 20MW reactor is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Commerce).

Availability: 

The HFIR runs seven, 24-day cycles of neutron production annually (>150 days/yr). Access to the HFIR instruments is provided through a DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences-sponsored user program. For most instruments, 75 percent of the instrument time is awarded through a semi-annual peer-review evaluation process. The remaining discretionary time includes the potential for "rapid access" and "proof-of-concept" experiments, which can be submitted at any time. Proprietary work can be considered as Work For Others on a full cost recovery basis. Most projects are non-proprietary. Contact the facility staff for more information.

Single Point of Contact: 

Name: Andrew Payzant, Engineering Materials Group Leader
Email: payzanta@ornl.gov
Phone: 865-235-4980

References: 
  1. Watkins T.R., Bilheux H.Z., An K., Payzant E.A., Dehoff R.R., Duty C.E., Peter W.H., Blue C.A., Brice C.A., "Neutron characterization for additive manufacturing," Advanced Materials & Processes, 171, 3, 23-27 (2013).
  2. Brady M.P., Rother G., Anovitz L.M., Littrell K.C., Unocic K.A., Elsentriecy H.H., Song G.L., Thomson J.K., Gallego N., Davis B., "Film Breakdown and Nano-Porous Mg(OH)2 Formation from Corrosion of Magnesium Alloys in Salt Solutions," Journal of the Electrochemical Society, 162, 4, C140-C149 (2015).
  3. Coakley J., Vorontsov V., Jones N.G., Radecka A., Bagot P.A., Littrell K.C., Heenan R.K., Hu F., Magyar A.P., Bell D.C., Dye D., "Precipitation processes in the Beta-Titanium alloy Ti-5Al-5Mo-5V-3Cr," Journal of Alloys and Compounds, 646, 946-953 (2015).
  4. Solanki K.N., Jordon J.B., Whittington W., Rao H., Hubbard C., "Structure-property relationships and residual stress quantification of a friction stir spot welded magnesium alloy," Scripta Materialia, 66, 10, 797-800 (2012).
Supporting Document(s): 

This capability is a user facility managed by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science. Each user facility has established processes for submitting a proposal and gaining access. Visit http://science.energy.gov/user-facilities/user-resources/getting-started for more information.